Images from
World War I



"To the Women of Britain" 
This is one of the posters used by the Parliamentary Recruiting Committee to recruit men to fight in the war.  The women in Belgium were raped and children brutally injured.  Propaganda was used by the British PRC to convince women to send their men to war in order to prevent the women and children of Britain from having the same fate as those in Belgium.








Source:
Grayzel, Susan R.  Women's Identities At War.  London: The University of North Carolina Press, 1999.
p. 62

Daughter Taking Over Father's Job
When men left for military service, their wives and daughters often took over their jobs.  Not only did this provide an income for the family, but it also secured the job for the man  when he returned home from the war.  In this photo, a girl is taking over her father's job as the official bill poster and town crier. 





Source:
Condell, Diana, and Jean Liddiard.  Working for Victory?: Images of Women in the First World War 1914-1918.  London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1987.
p. 10


Red Cross Nurses in Training
The women in this photo are sitting in on a Red Cross lecture training to be nurses.  As you can see in the photo, the women are dressed very nicely and are most likely to be from the upper and middle classes.  Since being a nurse was voluntary and unpaid, only those who could support themselves and their families were able to join in charity work.

Source:
Diana, Condell, and Jean Liddiard.  Working for Victory?: Images of Women in the First World War 1914-1918.  London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1987.
p. 13

Woman Gauging Shells
The woman in the photo is gauging shells at a munitions factory.  Making munitions and weapons was one of the ways women helped in the war efforts during World War I.  It's ironic how a woman's role was supposed to be a mother, someone who creates life and nurtures her children, but here, she's creating the weapons that will be taking lives.



www.corbis.com


Nurse Tending to German Soldiers
The woman in this photo is tending to German soldiers.  During World War I, the nurse was viewed as the ideal woman.  She was nurturing and pacifistic, and her kindness even extended to the
the enemies, the wounded German soldiers.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/war/wwone/women_combatants_03.shtml


Female Drivers Posing with Their Ambulances
Here is a photo of female drivers from the British Voluntary Aid Detachments posing with their ambulances.  During the first World War, women were not allowed to help fight directly on the frontline.  However, they were allowed to volunteer to be nurses and ambulance drivers.

www.corbis.com







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