Since Charles Perrault first published his fairy tale called : "Sleeping Beauty in the Woods," there have been many illustrations of the tale's main character: Aurora. We can examine the illustrations and note the distint changes between the pictures as they evolve from the earliest illustration by Gustave Doré to the most recent illustrations by The Walt Disney Company. The most significant difference is the change in Beauty's appearance. In the earlier versions she is plump and has dark hair, exhibiting the essence of a beautiful woman in the nineteenth century. The Disney version shows a thinner, blond-haired Beauty, displaying the twentieth-century image of a beautiful woman.

Illustration of the Prince Discovering Sleeping Beauty by Gustave Doré

Image provided by: Corbis.com

Painting of Sleeping Beauty by Sir Edward Coley Burne-Jones

Image provided by: "Victorian Art in Britain"

 

 

 

Illustration of Sleeping Beauty by the Walt Disney Company

Image provided by: Radix.net

 

This illustration of Aurora - Sleeping Beauty is an early nineteenth-century illustration by Gustave Doré. Doré provided illustrations for most of Charles Perrault's fairy tales when they were translated in the 1800's. Doré was born in Strasbourg in January 1832 and died in 1883. One of history's most famous aritists - Vincent van Gogh, referred to Doré as an "Artist of the People."

" Doré took his art directed to the masses thru his literary folios. Now all of Doré's art is in the public domain and it is reprinted all over the world. Doré's sets of engravings are etched into the memory of society's collective subconscious. That is his true legacy." - Post a Print

This illustration of Aurora - Sleeping Beauty is a nineteenth-century painting by Sir Edward Coley Burne-Jones. The beauty is modeled after the Jones' daughter Margaret. Sir Jones was born in 1833 in Birmingham and died in 1898. He became a painter in London in the mid-1850's and found a mentor in his "artistic hero:" Rossetti. As stated in his biography on the "Victorian Art" website, Mr. Jones is "one of our greatest 19 th century painters."

 

This illustration of Aurora - Sleeping Beauty is a twentieth-century illustration by the Walt Disney Company. The image is one of the many Disney Company illustrations for Walt Disney's version of "Sleeping Beauty." Walt Disney started the Walt Disney Company with the help of his brother Roy in 1923. Disney died in 1966 but the company continues to produce feature films and fairy tales.

 

The frame has the following short poem by William Morris : 

‘Here lies the hoarded love the key
To All the treasure that shall be
Come fated heart the gift to take
And smite the sleeping world awake.'

 

To read more about the artist: Gustave Doré, please refer to the following page: The Artists

The information for Gustave Doré is provided by: "Post a Print"

The image of Sleeping Beauty is provided by: Corbis.com

The original painting is located in Buscott Park, Oxfordshire.

To read more about the artist: Sir Edward Coley Burne-Jones, please refer to the following page: The Artists

All of the information about the painting above is provided by the "Victorian Art" website.


This illustration is part of the Disney Company's The Buena Vista Sleeping Beauty Theater.

To read more about the Walt Disney Company, please refer to the following page: The Artists

The information about the painting above is provided by the following websites:

Radix.net

home.neo.rr.com/memoriesofpast

 

 

 

"Snow white and the Seven Dwarfs" was first published by the Grimm Brothers in the nineteenth century.The following images show the changes in illustrations for the tale between the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The most significant changes that are present between the two illustrations are the changes in colors and the changes seen in the Dwarfs. The illustration of the nineteenth century is a black and white illustration and the twentieth-century version displays bright colors. The dwarfs in the nineteenth-century version are scary-looking while the dwarfs in Disney's version are playful and adorable. Both of these changes in the illustrations are due to significant changes in the readers of the tales. The Grimms' tale was read by adults as well as children in the eighteen hundreds. The Disney version is read primarily by children.

Illustration by Walter Crane of Snow White and the seven dwarfs from the Grimm's collection of fairy tales: Kinder und Hausmarchen.

Image provided by:

surlalunefairytales.com

Illustration of Snow White by the Walt Disney Company

Image provided by: Mouseplanet.com

 

 

This illustration of Snow White the seven dwarfs is a nineteenth-century illustration by Walter Crane. Crane was born in Liverpool in 1845. He was deeply inspired by Edward Coley Burne-Jones (the painter of the Sleeping Beauty painting above). Crane provided the Snow White illustrations for the translated version of the Grimms' Kiner und Haus Marchen collections. The title is translated to Household Stories from the Collection of the Brothers Grimm, and was published in 1882.

This illustration of Snow White and the seven dwarfs is a twentieth-century illustration by the Walt Disney Company. The image is one of the many Disney Company illustrations for Walt Disney's version of "Snow White." Walt Disney started the Walt Disney Company with the help of his brother Roy in 1923. Disney died in 1966 but the company continues to produce feature films and fairy tales.

 

To read more about the artist: Walter Crane, please refer to the following page: The Artists

The information for Walter Crane is provided by: Artmagick.com

The image of Sleeping Beauty is provided by: surlalunefairytales.com

To read more about the Walt Disney Company, please refer to the following page: The Artists

The information for Walt Disney is provided by: home.neo.rr.com/memoriesofpast

 

 

 

The tale of "Cinderella" is one the oldest tales known. In the illustrations below, one can see the changes in the illustrations and the painting of Cinderella that are presented between the nineteenth-century versions and the twentieth-century version. The most drastic changes are represented in Cinderella's appearance. In the nineteenth century versions tailored for adults, Cinderella seems unhappy, dirty, and tired from the overbearing housework that she is forced to do. However, in the twentieth century, young children are the main readers of the tales, and Disney makes Cinderella more appealing to the audience. She is still wearing an apron and doing housework but she looks happy and energized.

Illustration of Cinderella trying on the glass slipper by Frédéric
Théodore Lix

Image provided by: Corbis.com

Drawing of Cinderella in the corner by John S. Davis

Image provided by: corbis.com

 

 

Painting of Cinerella by Sir Edward Coley Burne-Jones

Image provided by: surlalunefairytales.com

Illustration of Walt Disney's "Cinderella" by the Walt Disney Company.

 

 

Image provided by: e-profession.com

This illustration of Cinderella is an early nineteenth-century illustration by Frédéric
Théodore Lix. This illustration is from Charles Perrault's collection of fairy tales: Les contes de
Perrault.
Lix was born in 1830 and died in 1897.

This illustration of Cinderella in the corner was drawn by John S. Davis. The original caption for the drawing is: "Cinderella is the corner--after Bertrand."

 

This illustration of Cinderella or "Cinder-slut" as she was originally called a nineteenth-century illustration by Sir Edward Coley Burne-Jones. Sir Jones was born in 1833 in Birmingham and died in 1898. He became a painter in London in the mid-1850's and found a mentor in his "artistic hero" Rossetti. As stated in his biography on the "Victorian Art" website, Mr. Jones is "one of our greatest 19 th century painters."

 

This illustration of Cinderella is a Walt Disney Company illustration and appears on a CD containing the soundtrack from the motion picture: "Cinderella."

There are many illustrations for Cinderella and they change slightly with the republications of the Tale by the Walt Disney Company.

Walt Disney started the Walt Disney Company with the help of his brother Roy in 1923. Disney died in 1966 but the company continues to produce feature films and fairy tales.

 

 

Sorry, there is no further information available for Frédéric Théodore Lix.

The information for Frédéric Théodore Lix is provided by: Corbis.com

The image of Cinderella is provided by: Corbis.com

Sorry, there is no further information available for John S. Davis.

The information for Frédéric Théodore Lix is provided by: Corbis.com

The image of Cinderella is provided by: Corbis.com


To read more about the artist: Sir Edward Coley Burne-Jones, please refer to the following page: The Artists

 

 

To read more about the Walt Disney Company, please refer to the following page: The Artists

The information for Walt Disney is provided by: home.neo.rr.com/memoriesofpast