Citations

Works :

Boswell, John.  The Kindness of Strangers.  New York: Pantheon Books, 1988.

Clauss, James J. and Sarah Iles Johnston.  Medea.  Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 1997.

Corti, Lillian.  The Myth of Medea and the Murder of Children.  Westport, Connecticut and London: Greenwood Press, 1998.

Euripides.  Medea. Trans. E.P. Coleridge.  Online. Internet Classics Archive. Internet. 11 Apr. 2001.   Available: http://classics.mit.edu/Euripides/medea.html

Gavitt, Philip.  "'Perche non avea chi la ghovernasse': Cultural values, family resources and abandonment in the Florence of Lorenzo de' Medici,1467-85*."  Poor Women and Children in the European Past. London and New York: Routledge, 1994.

Hanawalt, Barbara A.  -Crime and Conflict in English Communities, 1300-1348. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1979.

Hanawalt, Barbara A. "The Female Felon in Fourteenth Century England." Women in Medieval Society.  University of Pennsylvania Press, 1976.

Hanawalt, Barbara A. The Ties That Bound: Peasant Families in Medieval England.  New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1986.

Prado, Ignacio. "Medea: Characters." Online. SparkNotes LLC. Internet.  26 Apr. 2001Available: www.sparknotes.com/lit/medea

Pucci, Pietro.  The Violence of Pity in Euripidesí Medea.  Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 1980.

Ransel, David L.  "Abandonment and Fosterage of Unwanted Children: The Women of the Foundling System."  The Family in Imperial Russia: NewLines of Historical Research.  Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 1978.

Shahar, Shulamith.  Childhood in the Middle Ages.  London and New York: Routledge, 1990.

Symonds, Deborah A.  "Reconstructing rural infanticide in eighteenth-century Scotland." Journal of Women's History 10.2 (1998): 1-11

Viazzo, Pier Paolo, Maria Bortolotto, and Andrea Zanotto.  "Five centuries of foundling history in Florence:  changing patterns of abandonment, care and mortality."  Abandoned Children.  Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000.
 

Links :

www.bestanimations.com: A good source of animations.  Most of the animations you see on this website I found on this website.

www.corbis.com: This website has an enormous collection of pictures and paintings for a wide range of topics.  I would suggest it as a starting point in your search.

www.metacrawler.com: A very useful search engine because it will check your query in about 15 other search engines which gives you more links and is much quicker than having to go to each one individually.

http://hsa.brown.edu/~maicar/medea.html: A Greek Mythology Link that provides lots of information on Medea and all the events surrounding her character.